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Media damaging how young girls think

Becky Fritzsche, BHS Journalism

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Which is prettier, an unhealthy thin girl or the girl with an average body weight?

Since we were little girls we have always been told that we were supposed to be thin and curvy; there were never overweight or healthy models and dolls. While this is an unreasonable goal for every girl, it is still a stereotype. From the Kardashians to Barbies, girls are constantly being compared to the “body ideal.” Women and girls should no longer have to change for society to “fit in.”

While there are girls who are naturally thin and curvy, most women are not. Every girl’s body shape is different, from overweight to muscular to skinny. Even when most women get to an “ideal body shape” they are still told they do not have a thigh gap or their stomach is not flat enough. Media is constantly causing girls and women to feel bad about what they look like when they are perfect just the way they are.

For instance, Barbies. Every little girl wants to be Barbie; Barbie can do any job and every guy swoons at her. From her long thin legs, to her curves, and extremely thin waist, Barbie has an unrealistic figure that sets the standards for what women should look like to young girls. This does not just happen with dolls. From magazines to movies young girls are constantly seeing people with unreasonable figures. This sets bad images for them and can cause self body shame.

Women shouldn’t have to “fix” themselves to what other people want them to look like. Girls are constantly being told that they have to fix themselves so that other people like them. According to healthtalk.org, this can lead to mental and eating disorders; such depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder; these can all be caused by being bullied or not being happy with what you weigh.

According to happify.com, 69 percent of people in America are overweight. This puts a large amount of people who do not fit into this stereotype.

 People should be more accepting of different body weights and shapes as well as stop idealizing what they should look like.

Young girls need to be taught from the beginning that they should love and accept their body. No person should have to change for society, society should change for them.

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Media damaging how young girls think